Brewongle Environmental Education Centre

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So you take a feathery local species, like a Tawny Frogmouth, you mix in a crime scene, some suspects, plenty of hands on investigating and SHAZAM, you have yourselves an outdoor, eco-mystery challenge that never fails to grip primary age students. Our Eco Mystery day – ‘The Tawny Tragedy‘ is one of our most engaging programs. Students eyes widen when they arrive at Brewongle to discover a crime scene complete with police… Read More

We experience plenty of warm fuzzy feelings while doing our jobs as environmental educators but yesterday began with a lovely and remarkable happening. We were welcoming year 8 students from Broken Hill and Willyama High Schools to our field site at White Leeds Wetlands with an acknowledgement of country (This is a way to give our respect to the traditional Aboriginal people of this land). Sue Saxby from Wambangalang EEC near Dubbo… Read More

There is something inherently satisfying about pulling out weeds – don’t you agree? Managing ecosystems is a tricky complex business, but pulling out and poisoning noxious problem plants like lantana is a real, hands on result orientated activity. You can see and measure progress and I swear I could hear the native plants sighing as we removed choking thickets of smelly, prickly lantana. Lantana is a garden plant (from South America originally) that causes… Read More

Year 11 Biology students from Liverpool Girls High made the long trek to us this week. Many of them had not spent much time in the bush and enjoyed their time as ‘Ecologists’ studying the habitat of the elusive Spotted-Tailed Quoll. Quoll quiz Q1.  What do quolls eat? Q2. What is their preferred habitat? Q3. What are threats to the quoll? Q4. Where do they like to go to the toilet? Answers… Read More

Following on from a previous post that provided resources to help us understand the links between climate change and bushfires – the Climate Council has now released the main report that I mentioned. You can read the salient facts and download the full report here. I also took a spin on the weekend up to Bilpin and Mountain Lagoon to have a little squiz at regrowth happening now about 5-6 weeks post fire…. Read More

If I were to ask you for the plant that sums up Australia, would you say…… gum trees? Is there another genus of plant that has so dominated our landscape other than the ‘Ubiquitous Eucalyptus’? How has this one group that has over 900 species (and still counting) become so adept at surviving the harsh droughts, floods, fires and poor soils of the Australian continent? After our recent spate of bushfires in… Read More

Listen to Professor David Tissue as he explains his research at the Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment at UWS Richmond campus. A facinating experiment that is looking at plant responses to future rainfall changes as a result of climate change. These shelters allow reserachers to monitor and control the amount of moisture reaching the studied trees. This is the second video in a series that we have produced. You can view the… Read More

We are currently collaborating with UWS Hawkesbury campus to involve high school students in some of the amazing climate change research that is being undertaken at Richmond. I will feature three of the main experiments over the next few posts. Brewongle tested our documentary making skills by interviewing the researchers and filming on site at the University. Each of the videos showcases one research area and will be used as a pre-visit task by schools to familiarise themselves with… Read More

After our run of hot bushfire conditions, it was a gorgeous spring day that greeted Years 1-2 from Hobartville as they descended on Brewongle for two days of bugs and birds. The students tried to be quiet as we searched for the ever elusive birds (they usually appear as soon as the schools leave!). Once they mastered the use of binoculars, we spotted a kookaburra, king parrot, rainbow lorikeets and plenty of small birds. Teachers, you… Read More

We just enjoyed another camp with the fine students from JEPS. Thanks to all students, staff and parents from this lovely school for all your contributions over the two days. Enjoy the following gallery of photos! Click on the link to view them online. Some links that may be useful as follow up on some of our lessons: Dharug Dalang for Dharug language – http://www.dharug.dalang.com.au/Dharug/filedownload/FrontPage.html First Footprints – and excellent documentary and website… Read More